Archaeology Bible Review

The Archaeology Study Bible was sent to me by Crossway to review. This is the hardback version. I really like the look and feel of the hardback. The half dust jacket comes off and you have a really nice hardback book with the white spine. It is also available in imitation leather and genuine leather versions. It is not a compact Bible, by any means. 

This is a study Bible. It has full color pictures and maps throughout. You’ll also find interesting articles about archaeology, as well. This Bible will help you understand better the context of the Biblical world. 

There is just so much jam-packed into this Bible, I can only show so much. The pictures throughout are full color. I have no idea how they got such great quality printing on thin Bible paper, but somehow they managed it. There are so many good articles to help you understand the times, places, and items in the Biblical world. This Bible also has a pretty good concordance. If you are at all interested in archaeology or at all interested in the world of the Bible- this Bible will definitely be of help and interest as you study. 

This Bible would also make an awesome gift. I wish someone had gifted me a Bible like this as a teen, honestly. I would have gotten so much more out of it than the teen devotional Bibles I had. I’m not, at all, saying this Bible is juvenile, just that it has a reach that includes teens through Bible college students through people who have been in church all their lives and want to see the world of the Bible as they read about it. 

This Bible would also make an excellent homeschool or Sunday school resource. 

And if you’re reading this when it is written, one of my readers will be gifted this Bible for Advent. (Keep checking back for more details on that!) At the time of this writing, Christian Book Distributors has this Bible on sale! I recommend buying Bibles from CBD.com. They have great prices and selection when it comes to Bibles.

This post does contain affiliate links. Using these links does not cost you more, but is a great way to support your favorite bloggers. 

Becoming A Content Family – Week One

“But I rejoiced in the Lord greatly, that now at last you have revived your concern for me; indeed, you were concerned before, but you lacked opportunity. Not that I speak from want, for I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. Nevertheless, you have done well to share with me in my affliction.” Phillippians 4:10-14 (NASB)

Contentment is a hard one for most of us. We can barely wrap our head around what it means, much less commit ourselves to trying to have it. We often hear people refer to Philippians 4:13… I can do anything! Yea-uh! But all that stuff before it ― well… we usually don’t keep verses 10-12 with verse 13, and certainly not verse 14! But there they are. Better yet, here it is. Context. Paul is sitting in prison, writing to the Church at Philippi. He tells them that he knows they are concerned for him but assures them that he is content. Again: He is sitting in prison. He knows what it is like to be on the mountain and in the valley. He knows what it is like to be on top of the world and to be sitting in jail. He knows both, and he is content in both. He can do all things in Christ.

Contentment isn’t happiness, despite the dictionary defining it as happiness and satisfaction. Really, that sells the concept a bit short. It is more than just feeling happy. It is peace for what is. Not in a negative, whatever-will-be-will-be sense, but in a full, resting embrace of what is. It is ceasing to struggle for more, ceasing to grasp for more.

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Herein is our modern problem with finding contentment: We choose to go the way of the world; we desire more and more. Instead of taking the approach of focusing our eyes on God and letting the rest fall away, we want. We struggle. We grasp.

We might think that Paul is a little foolish in saying that he can be content with much, but let’s be honest: the more we have, the more we want. It seems that having less helps in our contentment. Oh, the paradox of it! We often find rich men more greedy than poor men. Why? They have enough; why are they not content? Why does the rich man find it harder to give? Prosperity can bring as many spiritual problems as neediness, sometimes even more. The story of the self-made man is that he thinks it is all on his own steam, but he doesn’t realize how much he needs a Savior or other people.

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This week, let’s focus on letting go of our desire for more, letting go of our desire for bigger stuff and better things. Let’s fix our eyes on God and let ourselves desire Him.

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Discussion questions:

  • Do you have a hard time being content?
  • Do you feel like you have enough?
  • What could we do as a family to become more content?
  • What luxuries could you do without? Would you be benefitted by that sacrifice?

Activities: (You can do all or none. Do them today or sometime this week.)

  • Have everyone make a list of what they think they need. Compare lists.
  • Create a picture of contentment. What does that word mean to you?

Write, tell, read, or watch a story about someone who got what they wanted, and found they didn’t really want it after all. (Examples: The movie, Home Alone. The book, The Chocolate Touch. The story of King Midas.)

My prayer for you:

Lord, help us as we become content with what we have. Remind us of how blessed we are as people. Help us to not covet. Show us the difference between needs and wants. Help us find peace and contentment in You. Amen.