Posted in Off The Bum, With The Kids

Let’s Talk About Cheap Amazon Diapers

So, if you’re at all like me, you see these super cheap cloth diapers on Amazon and you wonder, “Are they any good?” Plus, they make some awesome prints! I was gifted a few different brands, so I’ll give you the scoop on the ones that I tried.

First, I think a lot of the brands are the exact same. It appears that they are just rebranded by each company. So, don’t fret over Art of Life diapers or Alva diapers- they are the same. Buy whichever you think are cutest. I tried three brands. Art of Life, Alva Baby (with two different labels), and EcoAble. You’ll also see these, these, and these, which all look exactly the same. Now, the AoL and Alva diapers were the exact same since they were both pocket diapers. The EcoAble were a little different since they are All In One style. We’ll revisit those EcoAble diapers in a different post and focus on the cheapie pockets today.

The Art of Life and Alva diapers are identical. The tags are different, but the actual diaper is the exact same. Same dimensions. Same materials. Same efficacy. The Art of Life tagged diapers actually came from a company named “Lil Bit”, or at least that is what the inserts said. I’m telling you, they are all the same. I actually couldn’t find the AOL tagged diapers to link, but I swear they are out there.

How do they compare to a standard cloth diaper? I’m comparing them to a BumGenius pocket diaper because that seems very run of the mill basic to me. You can see from the pictures that the cheapies are much larger. They also don’t have any interior PUL foldover. The inside fabric is similar, but the cheapies are much rougher feeling. The outer fabric on the cheapies is much thicker. It is a TPU rather than a PUL. So it isn’t as thin. It isn’t breathable at all. And it doesn’t feel as soft.

But do they work? Well, yes and no. I tried both the microfiber inserts and the fancy charcoal inserts. I saw zero difference between those two. They both seemed to work the same. The inserts are actually so similar to my BumGenius inserts, that I now can’t tell which is which on my microfiber inserts.

The problem I have with them is that they are using the exact same size insert as the BumGenius pocket diaper. You can see that they are much bigger than the BumGenius pocket diaper. This means that the insert doesn’t cover all the way across. The inserts get bunched and move around a bit more because they don’t fit the space. I have had many leak issues, specifically through the stitch lines around the legs. Same inserts in the BumGenius diapers and they don’t leak.

So, I switched it up a bit. I tried out my Green Mountain Diaper prefolds instead of the microfiber or charcoal inserts. Because I could pad fold them wider, they worked like a charm. Zero leak issues using prefolds instead of the inserts they came with.

So, yes they work, but you need to modify the system a little bit. These also snap a bit different from the BumGenius. Instead of two parallel snaps, they use two snaps side by side on the top row and then a hip snap on the bottom row. I don’t see a difference with the snaps in how they function. They are just a bit different. But other diaper companies use this triangle snap system, so that isn’t weird or new. Just different from the diaper I’m using to compare.

So, is it worth it? It depends on your situation. If I had gotten these when I first started cloth diapering, I would have deemed the experiment a failure because of leaks. You really do have to work a bit harder to get these not to leak. And that means buying prefolds, so they aren’t as cheap as they seem. However, if you’ve got prefolds and are wanting some “easy” diapers for the sitter or grandma or whatever, these are excellent diapers for that use. They don’t make good overnight diapers. These aren’t so bad that I am looking to off load mine. But I am glad I have more than just these in my stash. They do make some really cute prints. These are my out and about daytime diapers and I now stuff them with Green Mountain Diapers prefolds. On the lowest setting, the small prefold fits well. On the largest setting, you’d need a large prefold.

These started fitting Daisy when she got around 10 lbs. They were a little big on her then, but they did work. I’d say 12 lbs. and up is probably the more reasonable size.

** This post does contain affiliate links. Using affiliate links does not cost you more, but it does help me out. I do receive a small commission when you purchase using my links. **

Posted in Off The Bum, With The Kids

BumGenius Flip Review

I’ve been cloth diapering a long time. So I have seen how diapers evolve. New brands starts. Old brands fade out. Old brands come out with new stuff. The Flip certainly isn’t new, but it took me a while to try it. I’m just going to be up front. The All In Two* concept was a total fail with me. I tried it when those first came out and they just were not my thing. So the Flip always seemed to be a combination of an all in two concept with a prefold and cover concept.

* All In Twos are diapers that have an outer cover but the insert is meant to be changed as needed, reusing the cover. This is usually done by having an insert that snaps or Velcros into place. It differs from the pocket because the Insert sits directly against the baby’s skin and there is no “stuffing” involved.

I was never very interested in the Flip, despite really liking BumGenius diapers and really liking prefolds and covers. But then some Flip diapers found there way into my hands and I figured it was time for me to try them.

Naturally, I’m comparing the Flip to my favorite diaper cover, The Rumparooz cover. That seemed logical to me. Now, I probably should have grabbed a brighter color to take photos of, because this particular color (this is the color Sweet) clearly doesn’t photograph well. I am reviewing both the aplix version and the snap version, but only took pictures of the snap because I hate aplix, though I did try it.

So, the Flip is essentially a diaper cover with a large front flap and back flap for you to place an insert into. You just tuck the insert under the front and back flaps. There are a variety of inserts. I tried the stay-dry insert and the organic daytime insert. I did not try the disposable insert. (I’m just not into half cloth and half disposable diapers. Those aren’t a need for me.)

I did not like either insert. They both leaked, even with a very small baby. Neither were absorbent enough, even after extensive prep. And I gave these things a several month trial. This is not a review based on one use. I tried them with my Green Mountain Diaper prefolds, and those worked a lot better.

The Flip covers are really wide. You can see them here with a BumGenius pocket diaper (the blue patterned diaper) and the BumGenius Freetime (in the color Kiss). The Flip is wider than both. I think they use the same pattern, but the Flip isn’t getting sewn the same way, so you’re gaining a half inch in the width of the diaper. I have very fat, short babies, but the Flip was far too wide in the crotch.

This shows the width of the Flip on the bottom with a Rumparooz One Size diaper cover on top. It is much wider. So, on a small baby, that meant I had to tuck the legs in a bit or the diaper would be from her knees to her belly button.

One thing I dislike about BumGenius diapers across the board is the lack of the double gusset. It was especially problematic on a diaper cover to not have that second gusset to hold in #2.

Also, the Flip only has elastic in the back. (Well, that applies to all BumGenius diapers.) So, there were definitely leaks from having a little too much room in the waist.

They also didn’t work like you think they would. For a small, EBF baby, every time she pooped, it got on the cover. I find this true every single time I pad fold a prefold. It just isn’t my preferred method, I like the prefold wrapped around them so I have double protection from leaks.

Now, in a Flip, you can ignore the front and back flaps and just use it like a regular cover, which is what I ended up doing most of the time. However, the flaps can’t be wiped off like a regular cover, so I found that I only liked using it once or twice before I felt like it was dirty. With other diaper covers, I can usually get 3-4 uses out of them before they just feel dirty. (You wipe them out with a wet wipe after use and let it dry while you use another one.) So, instead of going through 2 diaper covers in a day, I was going through 5 (at least).

Also, I still hate Velcro. I gave the aplix (Velcro is the brand name. Aplix is the generic name. Like saying “facial tissue” or “Kleenex”.) a try. And while they weren’t evil in the wash and kept stuck to their tabs as they should, I still hate the way they wear. Even though BumGenius rounds the edges of their aplix, they are still really stiff and uncomfortable against the baby’s skin. And they will still get snagged on their clothes or yours if they have half a chance. And the aplix starts looking worn out really fast. Snaps look new for a long time. Aplix look ragged very quickly.

Now, the price is where Flip users are usually really happy. Right now, they are running $12.95 to $14.95 a cover. I’m not even going to discuss the inserts, because I think the Green Mountain Diaper prefolds are much better regardless (and they are cheaper). But the covers are a little less expensive that my favorite cover. (Rumparooz are $14-$16 a cover depending on print.) However, I require twice as many Flip covers because they get dirty so much easier and quicker! I can totally get by with 6 covers and 24 prefolds with the Rumparooz covers. However, with the Flips, I would need 10 covers and 24 inserts to be washing at the same frequency. (Every other day.)

So, not a fan of the BumGenius Flip covers. They aren’t terrible. They work for the most part. Are they the first diaper I reach for? No. Are they what I would recommend? No. Are they the cheapest option? No.

* I used small Green Mountain Prefold diapers with the Flip snapped down small. When it is unfolded all the way, a medium Green Mountain prefold is what I found to fit.

** This post contains affiliate links. I do earn a small amount of money when your use my affiliate links to purchase items using these links. **

Posted in Off The Bum

Which Diaper System Should I Choose?

There are so many kinds of cloth diapers out there, it can be difficult to choose which system will work best for your family. You research and research and finally decide, Yes! I will cloth diaper my children. Then, you are faced with which diapers to buy! It can be overwhelming trying to figure out the pros and cons of each system, especially since you’ll be pulling from individual diaper reviews and diaper sites. I often get asked why I chose what I chose, why I like my diapers, and would I choose again the same way if I had to do it all over again. Well, here is an overview of different styles of cloth diapers and what I think is nice about them and what I think is awful about them.

Prefolds (or flats) & Covers

+ They are the cheapest system available.

+ They provide a level of excitement, providing the daily challenge of achieving that perfect fold.

+ Dry quickly.

– They are the most intimidating system, especially to husbands and child care providers.

– Pins or snappis are usually required. (I have a personal aversion to pins and snappis.)

– Can be difficult to get the absorbency just right.

– Often bulky.

– Can be difficult to get on a squirmy baby or toddler.

– Sizes are usually needed. (There are a few kinds that offer one size covers. Econobum is the main one that comes to mind.)

Fitteds and Covers


+ Cute and often trim.

+ Great for containing messes. (Really great fro holding in newborn poo!)

+ Very absorbent and usually require little “fiddling” to get absorbency right.

+ Easier to use.

+ Can easily use all natural fibers only.

+ Can make yourself or buy from a work at home mom.

+/- Can be the most expensive system or a very affordable system depending on your personal choices.

– The most addictive cloth diapering system. (Yes, cloth diapers can be addictive.)

– More difficult to adjust absorbency if the absorbency isn’t right for your little one from the start.

– Take more time to dry.

– Usually need various sizes. (There are a few brands that offer a One Size fitted diaper and you can find One Size covers.)

Pocket Diapers


+ Easy to use.

+ Most common type of One Size diapers.

+ Dry quickly.

+ Easy to adjust absorbency.

+ Only require one diaper “layer.” No extra cover is needed.

– Require “assembly” of diapers after each wash.

– Usually made of man made fibers.

– Can be expensive, depending on the diaper you choose.

All-In-One Diapers


+ Easy to use. Easy for you. Easy for husbands. Easy for child care providers.

+ No assembly required. Ready straight from the wash.

+ Only one diaper “layer” is needed. No extra cover necessary.

– Can take quite a while to dry.

– More difficult to adjust absorbency if you need to.

– Can be quite expensive.

All-In-Two Diapers


+ Fairly easy to use.

+ Dry faster than all-in-ones.

+ Theoretically, you can reuse the outer cover, meaning you’ll have less diaper laundry and less cost.

– Not a good system for babies with loose poo. (The poo contaminates the cover, eliminating the chance of reusing it.)

– Require “assembly” before use.

What to do with all this information?

Well, I looked at everything and narrowed down the most important for me. I knew I would be drying my diapers in my dryer, so I’d want something that dried quickly. I knew I needed something that would work immediately without a lot of trial and error. The Pastor was barely on board with cloth diapering, so I needed it to work and be easy for him. I wanted a one size solution, since I have multiple children in diapers at one time, I didn’t want to have to separate and keep several different sizes out all the time. I just needed one stash for all the children I was diapering (except newborns). I did not want to use snappis or pins.

So, with all that information, I chose to buy one size pocket diapers. They worked without any playing around with them. They were easy to use. The only real downside for my family is that I have to assemble them when they come out of the dryer and that takes time.

I have since used every other system, except prefolds. I can say, I can find things I like and don’t like about them all. If I had to do it over again, I would have bought less variety and tried to stick with one brand. (Having a bazillion brands makes it difficult when you are assembling your diapers. It also makes it difficult on care providers to switch from one brand to another, when they aren’t really comfortable with my diapers to begin with.) I love fitteds and covers for the newborn stage! I really dislike all-in-twos.

So, what should I choose?

That is up to you. You shouldn’t feel like you have to choose just one system. I knew that in the beginning, it would make it easier for The Pastor if I only had one system. But many families use on system at home and one system while out. Or one system during the day and another at night. Choosing an easier system at first will make your transition into cloth easier. (Some people find prefolds very frustrating and quit cloth diapering because of these frustrations.) It is up to you!

A note about one size diapers: I often find that I would have probably liked sized diapers, too. There are several brands of one size diapers that require internal adjustment of either the diaper or the insert, that defeat my “one stash” goal. Also, diapers don’t last forever, so with one size diapers now on their third bum, I find they get very worn out. It might have been just the same to buy the various sizes and end up with more diapers, lasting longer. As it is, I must replace my diapers when they’ve had enough. I once thought one size diapers would save me money, and if I had one child, they would. But since I’ve now cloth diapered 3, I find that I would have spent the same, either way.

Happy Diapering!!! (You can check out my reviews of each of my diapers in the “Off The Bum” category.)

Posted in Off The Bum

You do what?

I am frequently asked many, many questions about cloth diapering. I know I had the same questions before I chose to make the switch to cloth. I figured I would make a list and answer the common cloth diapering questions I get. (This will not cover certain laundry specific questions, that is another post entirely!)

Do you REALLY save money cloth diapering?

Oh my, yes! I save a lot of money! Here is the actual breakdown:

Disposables: $10.99/pack (We used Seventh Generation Diapers before we switched to cloth because of my kid’s sensitivities to the chemicals in disposable diapers.) We used about 2 packs every week. So, that is $1,142. 96 per year (before tax) on diapers alone. (or $95.25 per month.) Add the $16 a month for a box of wipes and that is $1334.96 a year. (or $111.25 a month.) Add the $5 a month for the diaper genie refill. So, your grand total for disposables comes to $1394.96 a year. ($116.25 a month)

Cloth Diapers: The average price of a cloth diaper is $18, so I will use that number as my estimate. (Some diapers are more, some are less. I have quiet the mix.) So, based on that figure, I’d have 24 diapers for the same 2 kids in disposables we talked about above. That would be $432 in diapers. (My own personal diaper stash actually cost me less than $300.) And lets say you buy wipes (I made mine from flannel scraps for FREE), that would be $21 for 30. So, now our total is up to $453. Now, let’s also say you decided to buy wipe solution. That would add $21. (I buy mine for $3.50 a container and if I used a lot of it, I’d use one container every 2 months. As it is, I actually use one container about every 3 or 4 months.) Now our total is up to $474. Add two diaper pail liners at $33 for 2 and our total is now $507. (I made mine for FREE from some leftover home decor fabric I had lying around.

So, not attempting to be economical in both situations, you would save $886.96 by switching to cloth in one year. (And note that beyond that year, you continue to save more money! Your only continuing expense with cloth in this scenario is wipes solution.

What do you do when they poop?

Well, first I run in circles screaming before throwing all their clothes in the fireplace and burning them! Okay, so not really. But what do you do when your kid poops? Let’s see… you change their diaper? Wow? Really?! Me, too!

First off, let me clear the air. You are NOT SUPPOSED to roll your child’s poop up in their diaper and toss it in the trash. Human excrement is not a substance that should go to a landfill. You are SUPPOSED to dump their poop into the toilet and flush it, then throw away the soiled diaper. That said, I don’t know of anyone that uses disposable diapers that does not throw away poop! But in case you ever wondered, you are not supposed to do that!

There is a huge misconception out there that you must rinse or swirl dirty cloth diapers in the toilet or place them in some vat of magic poop erasing solution to clean them. You don’t. There are some people out there that still choose to rinse diapers or use a “wet pail” system for whatever reason, but that is not the norm. (It is usually only for people that use prefolds or flats, though some people like rinsing.) Most cloth diapering families simply dump the poop in the toilet (as everyone SHOULD- just teasing you) and then place the dirty diaper in their diaper pail. With exclusively breastfed babies, you don’t even have to dump the poop! WHAT?! Yes, the poop in water soluble and in easily rinsed off in the washer. A cold water rinse in the washing machine prior to your wash cycle.

An added note on poop, flushing all poop down the toilet teaches your kid a very important life lesson. Poop always ends up in the toilet. It makes it easier to associate poop with toilets when they ALWAYS see poop going into the toilet. (And as young as 12 months, they can begin flushing their own poop down. Allowing you to introduce them to the potty in a non-threatening and non-expecting kind of way.) The toilet is never a “new” thing since it has always been part of the diapering process.

What do you do when you go out?

We all go commando. No, really? What do YOU do when YOU go out? You change your babies diaper. If there is no trash to illegally toss that poop in, then what do you do? You put your diaper in a bag and toss it when you can (or when you get home). That is not far from what I do. If there is a toilet, I dump the poop before putting the diaper in a bag to take it home. No toilet? I put the diaper, poop and all, into a bag and dump the poop when I get home. Yes, that can be gross. But I think about that $886.96 while I’m doing it. (I once wiped butts for a living, so clearly poop & money go hand in hand for me.) I don’t find it difficult to cloth diaper ALL the time. Some families do choose to cloth diaper at home and use disposables when out.

What do you do on vacation?

Wash diapers. Seriously. When we visit family, it is easy. You just wash in their washing machines for a few days. When we went to the beach last year, we stayed in a condo that had a washing machine and dryer. Easy. If we are staying in a hotel, I will see if I can go the entire time without washing (if it is only one or two nights it is no problem at all). If I don’t make it, I then try to find a laundromat. (Disposable diapers can always be purchased if all else fails.) I have not found it to be a big deal at all. The main concern when we are heading out of town is to make sure all my diapers are washed and ready to go the moment we need to leave.

How do you sanitize them?

First, I think you think too highly of your chemical filled disposables. (Yeah, I know, a little harsh.) But seriously, you are wondering now what is lurking in my cloth diapers, so let’s imagine what chemicals are lurking in yours. (Think about the bleaches, fragrances, creepy gel filling stuff, etc.) Now, let’s talk about mine. My diapers are washed in HOT water. That plus the detergent takes care of most everything. I then dry my diapers on low heat, but after removing the PUL parts, I dry the inserts (the absorbent parts of my diapers) on high heat. That kills any bacteria that could be lurking about. Some people use a BacOut solution to get rid of harmful stuff. I think hot water and high heat are enough. (When you kids begin to potty train, what do you do if they wet the bed, their clothes, etc? You wash and dry it. If it is enough for your towels, it is enough for your diapers.)

Isn’t it gross?

Well, having kids is a fairly messy ordeal in and of itself. Changing diapers is never a CLEAN event. Kids poop. And they vomit and snot and spit all over, too, but that is beside the point. But washing diapers is no more gross than having to take out the diaper genie trash. It is also no different having a diaper pail full of cloth diapers next to your changing table than it is to have a disposable diaper pail there. You reuse your undies. Your toddlers reuse their undies. You don’t have to personally grab poop with your bare hands. You aren’t tossing dirty diapers around your house like mini time bombs. I’m not sure what is so “gross” about the concept. It is kind of funny to me that most men ask this. As if men are THAT clean? I mean, really. Your underwear are 10 years old and you’ve got rock hard pit stains on your under shirt and you think washing and using a diaper again is gross. Okay, dude.

Isn’t cloth diapering difficult?

Can you use your washing machine? Oh, you can? Well, then you won’t find cloth diapering difficult at all.

What about wasting water? Isn’t that as bad as filling up a landfill with poop?

Well, cloth diapering adds one extra load of wash a day to every other day (or every third day for some). You are going to add one toilet flush a day per child you cloth diaper. (For children eating solids and having solid poops.) That isn’t really THAT much. (Especially since that toilet flush shouldn’t really be EXTRA.) Believe me, teenagers do more water wasting than cloth diapering. (Unless it is a teenage boy in that “no bathing” stage they hit before they realize girls like clean boys.) To be honest, our water bill has not changed due to cloth diapering. If you live in an extremely dry place on SEVERE water restrictions, you probably would prefer to use disposables. But let’s all be clear and realize we are seriously talking about one medium load of laundry a day. You have to decide what makes sense for you and your community.

Don’t you have to change their diapers more often?

So, I know YOU wouldn’t ask this, but SOMEONE has. No, with cloth you cannot let a child sit in their urine all day without changing them. Yes, that creepy gel stuff in disposables does allow you to hold off for 8 hours until the gel part starts leaking down their legs. So, if you are accustomed to using 2 or 3 diapers a DAY for you child because you would hate to WASTE a diaper, then cloth diapering will seriously increase your diaper changes. You may even have to check on their diaper every 2 or 3 hours! Gasp! However, if you usually don’t like to let your child sit in urine, and change their diaper 6 to 8 times a day, cloth diapering will not increase the diaper changes you do.

On that note, cloth diapering can be very reassuring to a breastfeeding mom (especially if it is her first bay). With disposables, sometimes you wonder if it is really wet or not (especially on little babies) because that creepy gel stuff absorbs so much! If it is not OVERLY full, you wonder and worry. With cloth, you can clearly see if they are wet. You can feel the insert (or diaper) and easily see that, yes, they are wet. No wonder. No Worry.

Don’t cloth diapers leak a lot?

Well, if I left them for hours upon hours , then yes, they eventually leak. However, I have had far fewer poop leaks with cloth than with disposables. (Want to talk about gross? Newborn poo in their hair! That is gross!) Cloth diapers hold poop in much better than disposable diapers do. Like disposables, when babies get mobile, sometimes they shimmy their diaper into a weird position and will leak. It is true, cloth diapers do not hold as much liquid as the creepy gel in disposables. However, most parents do not use the full maximum absorbency that a disposable diaper has. (Except for those that throw dirty Huggies in the Wal-Mart parking lot. THOSE parents use that absorbency to the MAX!)

Won’t cloth diapers turn your child into a Democrat?

Not that I am aware. I’ll get back to you in 15 years when my oldest registers to vote.

Posted in Off The Bum

Wild Child For Babies Diaper Review

I purchased 12 Wild Child For Babies All in One diapers before Emery was born. I paid $100 for the dozen, so the price was great! The Pastor was not sure about the fitted diapers, so I bought some All-in-Ones for him, since he said he would prefer that.

These diapers were very large for newborn diapers. In fact, they are closer to a size medium Prowrap cover than a newborn. (They could be a small, but I never had a small cover, so I couldn’t say.) I kept trying them on Emery because I wanted them to work. They have no umbilical snap down or scoop. They are large. Around 8 lbs, they began fitting Emery, but I had such trouble with leaking. I ended up using them as a fitted because I never could get them to not leak. They fit from a rolly 8 lbs. to 15 lbs.or more! Maybe a thinner, but large baby would have had better luck. I’m not sure.  I put one on 25 lb. Aidan one day & they fit him though they were a bit low rise. And they did not leak on Aidan. I was super quick to change him, but I can say they did not leak. I may pull them back out and see how they work on Emery now. I tried them again when he was around 16 lbs., but they didn’t fit well. They were tight on his thighs and still leaked.

A side by side comparison of a Newborn Wild Child For Babies All-in-one and a bumGenius One Size Organic All-in-one. Both on their smallest settings.

Side by side comparison of a Newboren Wild Child For Babies All-in-one and a Newborn Graham Bear Wear Fitted. Wild Child is on the smallest setting and the Graham Bear wear is on the “medium” setting.

Wild Child for Babies newborn all-in-one diapers have cotton velour interior. Mine had the cute cotton knit fabric on the outside. These diapers are not very trim. They take FOREVER to dry. In fact, The Pastor used to complain about how long it took our bumGenius organic all-in-one to dry, but once we started using these, he was wishing they dried as fast as the bumGenius all-in-one! Seriously,  these took me 4 dryer cycles to dry. If you hang them, they’ll be hanging for over 24 hours before they are dry! These do not have a scoop or snap down, so you have to wait until the baby’s umbilical cord stump falls off before you can use these.

Do I recommend these diapers? I can’t. They did not work for me. If that changes, I’ll let you know. And here is where I insert a disclaimer. Not every diaper works for every baby. Some people adore the diapers I hate. Some people hate the diapers I adore. Wild Child for Babies may work perfectly for some. They just didn’t work for me.

Posted in Off The Bum

Graham Bear Wear Diaper Review

Emery is our first baby to cloth diaper from birth. I knew my one size diaper stash would not fit him at birth. (Though have since tried WAHMies one size diapers and they would have easily fit him from birth.) We decided to go with fitteds and covers. I really like fitteds. They are a great option for newborns. Why? Well, newborns have that runny, explosive poo and the fitteds keep that inside the diaper where it belongs! If ever the poo escapes the fitted, it still remains securely inside the cover. We never had a single poo leak with Emery in fitted diapers. (Disposable diapers always allowed explosive poo leaks with the older two!)

At first, I ordered 6 Graham Bear Wear diapers. They are so trim and so cute! These are extremely well made diapers! She uses Zorb and they are so trim because of that. These also have a snap down in the front to protect the umbilical stump. Graham Bear Wear diapers have cotton velour interior (often hand dyed to match the outer fabric you choose). The outer is the cotton of your choice. She has so many lovely fabric choices! I have no two Graham Bear Wear diapers that are alike! Talk about fun! And each diaper comes with a matching liner!

After Emery was born, I ordered 6 more because they were such great diapers! The Pastor even liked these diapers, though he was initially very hesitant about fitteds and covers.

You do need a cover, since fitted diapers are not waterproof. Graham Bear Wear diapers easily fit my 6 lb. 13 oz. boy and would have easily fit my firstborn (5 lbs. 2 oz. at birth).  These easily fit under a Prowrap newborn diaper cover. These fit Emery until he was about 11 lbs. and ready for our one size diaper stash!

Photot of a Graham Bear Wear Newborn fitted diaper beside a bumGenius one size oraganic all-in-one to show you the size. The Graham Bear Wear diaper is set on its “medium” setting. The bumGenius diaper is as small as it gets.

A side by side comparison of a Graham Bear Wear Newborn Fitted Diaper with a Nanipoo Fitted Diaper.

Would I recommend Graham Bear Wear fitted newborn diapers? Absolutely! And I do! These are my favorite newborn fitted diaper! They are still in excellent condition after one newborn. I bought them for $50 for 6. Talk about a great deal! The only downfall is that you may not get as much money back if you plan to sell them once your newborn is out of them. Graham Bear Wear is a relatively new shop, so the word is not quite out there about what wonderful diapers they are. I am keeping mine! Hopefully I will get to use them again!

My newborn diaper stash.

Nancie was easy to work with. She made and shipped my diapers quickly! She even threw in a couple velour wipes with one of my orders! (And those are lovely if you are in the market for cloth wipes and don’t make your own!) She had so many cute and fun fabrics to choose from and hand dyed the velour to match many of my diapers.

**UPDATE: While I still adore my Graham Bear Wear diapers, it appears that they are no longer around. Which means that NONE of my newborn diaper making folks are in business anymore. If you come across them on diaperswappers, know they are awesome diapers. But it looks like for the time being, you can’t get GBWs.**

***UPDATE: She’s back! You can get them on Etsy again! Yay!***

Posted in Off The Bum

Gro Baby Diapers

You’re confused, right? What on earth is The Pastor’s wife doing with an All-in-Two diaper? She’s a One Size Pocket girl! Well, yes, I am a One Size Pocket girl, but these Gro Baby One Size All-In-Two diapers were generously donated to The Parsonage (Thank you, Melissa!). So, I have tried them out (meaning I’ve used them over 100 times each) and are letting you know what I think.

A side by side comparison of a Gro Baby One Size AI2 (left) with a Haute Pocket One Size Pocket diaper. Both on larger setting.

A side by side comparision of a Gro Baby One Size AI2 Diaper with a Haute Pocket One Size Pocket Diaper. Both on small setting.

So, here is how these diapers work. The outer shell has a mesh (think basketball shorts) interior and two snaps. The inserts snap onto the outer shell and you can set a doubler on top of that. I was given 2 shells, 4 inserts, and 2 doublers. The theory is that when your little one wets the insert, you simply remove it and insert another, reusing the outer shell. That absolutely works out for older babies and toddlers. It does not work so well for little ones. When they are little (the babies, that is) they poop every time they eat. This means that they soil the shell and you can’t just pop in a new insert. Eventually, they get to where they only poop 5 times a day, which still doesn’t work out well for an all-in-two system. Then somewhere around 3 or 4 months old, they begin pooping only once a day (or once every three days). Then this system works pretty well.

Interior of Gro Baby One Size AI2 Diaper. To the right of the diaper is the doubler for it.

Interior of Gro Baby One Size AI2 Diaper with no insert. The inserts attach using the snaps on the shell. You can also see the mesh inside of the shell.

So, here you see the aplix tab. Gro Baby has very gentle aplix tabs and the entire upper part of the diaper is the “loop” portion of the aplix. It is very gentle. It does not gather fuzz or lint and is not too very grabby in the wash. The laundry tabs don’t always stay closed, but they usually end up hooked to themselves and not snagging my other diapers, so I won’t complain too much about that. The aplix is easily opened by a toddler, though. It does not take much effort to open it. It actually feels more like a disposable diaper tab. I have many, many problems with the weakness of these tabs.
These diapers are pretty small. They are very short, but kind of wide. They are similar in fit to a Rocky Mountain One Size or Tweedle Bugs One size, but a bit smaller. These fit Emery (17 lbs. and round) well. They seem the barely fit Aidan (26 lbs. and average to thin). They don’t fit Imogene at all. Realistically, I’d say the range on these is 6 lbs. to 30 lbs. Kind of crummy, since an all-in-two works best for older babies and toddlers. The weak aplix makes it impossible to keep on a child if using them on the larger setting. The tabs just let go when they are under any strain at all!

They are absorbent and work as a night diaper with the doubler, provided your child is a back sleeper. They leak with side sleepers and larger tummy sleepers.  I do have the “old” version (I think new ones are coming soon), so I’m not sure if they will make the shells bigger with the new version. I love that the snaps aren’t white. It just looks cool. It makes them look nicer.

Do I recommend Gro Baby One Size Diapers? Hmmm. Yes, I had to think about it! On one hand, they look nice and work well for 4 months through 2  years. On the other hand, they don’t fit an older toddler and cannot be used as intended before 3 and a half to 4 months old. (Though they do “work” in the sense that they fit and don’t leak. You cannot reuse the shell when a little baby explodes poo all over it. So, you’d have to buy enough to change the shell every time. So, it doesn’t “work” for using one shell for every 2-3 inserts.) They are easy to get on and off, so an ECer may like them a lot for that.  So, I guess I sort of recommend them. Just so long as you are aware of their limitations and the deviations from the all-in-two plan. Don’t cry to me when you buy 8 shells & 24 inserts for a newborn, only to find the shells only get you through half a day. And don’t cry when you love them, but your 3 year old is still not wanting to potty train but just does not fit in your beloved Gro Baby diapers anymore. They are pretty neat diapers, but could use a lot of work! (Manufacturer of Gro Baby, if you’re reading this, make them bigger! Make the inserts a bit longer! Make the aplix stronger, or better yet, switch to snaps entirely!)

**Update**

After using them for about 150 washes, the elastic is getting much less springy. The back elastic on all my Gro Baby diapers is completely shot and the leg elastics are all making their way toward that end. So, less than 6 months of good elastic use. This could be due to squeezing my average size two and a half year old in them (which should be fine). I think I could have gotten another month or two out of the elastic if only the baby was using them. Which, the baby is the only one using them now, since the 29 lb. 2 year old no longer fits in them.

Posted in Off The Bum

Happy Heiny One Size Pocket

I bought one Happy Heiny when I first convinced The Pastor that we should cloth diaper the little ones. I purchased the aplix version under the impression that The Pastor was certainly not capable of snapping a diaper. I thought, “I’ll have to use aplix (velcro for those that aren’t in the know about such things) because snaps are too difficult for The Pastor and he’ll get so frustrated he will forbid me to cloth diaper our children!” So, there were a couple problems with that thought. The first was that anyone would forbid ME to do anything! Ha! Such a silly thought! The second was that aplix is somehow easier. It isn’t. In fact, my experience has been that aplix makes my life more difficult. Yes, grandma’s and babysitters can much more easily figure out an aplix cloth diaper. But really, once you’ve put on a snap diaper once or twice, it is simple. Really. It isn’t rocket science- just diapers. And if you can figure out how to work those blasted adjustable waist kid pants, then pocket diapers will be a breeze for you!

What a rant! Okay, I guess I should start my actual review. The Happy Heiny diaper we own has been labeled since the beginning as “Imogene’s diaper.” She still wears it at night. Why? Well, the fit of this diaper is very, very specific. Yes, it is a one size diaper, but it is not for the round child. Imogene was 2 when we started cloth diapering, so she was out of her round stage. She fit in this diaper so well. Aidan was a terrible fit, still is to some extent. Emery is a terrible fit.

The interior fabric of a Happy Heiny is fleece. Yes, it pills with repeated use. No, the laundry tabs do not work. This diaper is the cause of many, many snags on my other diapers (usually my bumGenius diapers- they must be enemies). The large aplix tabs warp in the dryer. They still work, they just don’t look nice. When you put it on, you can kind of straighten them back out a bit, but they are forever warped. The aplix does accumulate fuzz and things, but it continues to work. And a note, they are not joking that the lime green color is lime! It glows!

These diapers have an odd fit. They are much longer in the rise than other diapers. That makes them a good fit for toddlers and longer babies. They are fairly narrow width wise. So, if your child is a rolly little thing, this diaper is not going to fit him right. If, on the other hand, you are diapering tall or slender children, this diaper will fit lovely. It would fit an 8 lb. baby, but not extremely well. Realistically, you could expect it to fit closer to 10 lbs. It will fit all the way up to 40 lbs. (maybe even 45 lbs. if you toddler doesn’t have thunder thighs like mine does!)

I like the shape of the Happy Heiny insert. It is an 8 or an hourglass, whichever way you choose to look at it. The insert alone is a great product! It would make you Blueberrys and Econappis work so much better!

I don’t have leaking issues with this diaper at all. I do have the many, many fit issues. And of course, I have the laundry frustration of it grabbing onto everything else in the wash!

Do I recommend Happy Heiny One Size Pocket diapers? Well, only if your child is a difficult fit and it slender. For kids that are lean, tall, skinny, etc. this diaper may be just what you need. I would recommend you go for the snap version over the aplix version, though I’ve never tried the snap version. Aplix does offer more help in the way of difficult fits, but you will have to deal with the headaches that come with aplix. I won’t be buying more, they just don’t work well enough for all the kids. (And the point of me having one size diapers is that all diapers fit all kids needing diapers.)

Looking for a similar fit to a Happy Heiny? Try WAHMies One Size Pocket diapers. They are just as tall, only slightly wider- fitting a broader range. Plus the WAHMies have an extra set of snap that make them easily fit a newborn! Want fleece interior similar to a Happy Heiney, but don’t like the fit? Try Tweedle Bugs. (Blueberry Deluxe diapers also have the same fleece, but I don’t really recommend Blueberry diapers.)

**Update**

This diaper still fits Imogene. She is now night time potty training, so it may get passed down to Aidan. (It fits him a little better now that he isn’t so round.) After 15+ months of daily use, the leg elastic has decided to wear out. This is a quicker wear than bumGenius (3.0 or organic AIOs), Blueberry, and Econappis. However, it is much longer than Haute Pockets! 450+ uses before elastic fails is completely acceptable to me! Elastic will not last forever, but this seems to be a decent amount of use out of the elastic.

Posted in Off The Bum

BumGenius 3.0 One Size Pocket

Like my grumpy little bumGenius model? He is just so lovable, even grumpy.  I can’t say the same for bumGenius.

I am not a bumGenius fan. There. I said it. I’m glad we got that out of the way first. While I am not a fan, the 3.0 one size pocket has some nice parts. One nice part that no other diaper I have tried has is a little extra PUL protection around the top inside front of the diaper. bumGenius puts a little strip of PUL around the top of the inside of the front. Why is that cool? Well, one size diapers tend to flip out a bit at the top on the smaller sizes. Those adorable little chubby bellies tend to roll the front of the diaper down. (I know you know what I’m talking about. My maternity jeans did it ALL THE TIME!) That little extra strip of PUL keeps urine from wicking out the top via the interior fabric. (Not common, but happens a lot at night when they wet their diapers a lot.) Another plus is that suedecloth (which is the interior fabric of a bG 3.0 unless you get your hands on some of the limited edition fleece versions) does not stain. It also wicks away wetness pretty well. I also cannot say I’ve got any serious leaking problems. I love their inserts, I’ve got several extras that I use for added protection when needed. That is where my likes end.

Wow! I dislike my bumGenius diapers so much I don’t take pictures of them! Yikes. Well, now for what I do not like about bumGenius 3.0 one size pocket diapers. Suedecloth is quite possibly my least favorite interior fabric for a diaper. It tends to make all my little ones have small red bumps on their bums. (Smartipants and Rocky Mountains also do this, since they are suedecloth inside, too.) And suedecloth is not the softest stuff around. (Kind of reminds me of a softish polyester felt.) I also loathe velcro, or aplix if you’d rather use the cloth diaper term. BumGenius has particularly terrible aplix. It really grabs everything in the world and gets weak very fast. I have to weekly attempt to remove the strings and lint build up in the aplix. The laundry tabs are also a joke. They don’t hold at all. (Blueberrys are the only aplix diaper I have that holds to the laundry tabs.) So, really the bumGenius 3.0 just has all the things I happen to dislike in a diaper. If they had a snap version, I might like that. (Especially if it was a snap & fleece version- oh wait! That would be a Haute Pocket!!) The aplix issue makes this diaper’s life max out around a year and a half.

Realistically, this diaper fits around 8 lbs. You may be able to make it work on a 7 lb. baby since it is velcro. And it does max out between 35 and 40 lbs. (38 lb. Imo can wear these in a pinch, but they are tight and uncomfortable on her.) The shape of these is the same as a Haute Pocket or Smartipants.

Would I recommend the bumGenius 3.0 One Size Pocket Diaper? Not really. If you like aplix and suedecloth, then go for it. If you like the idea of bumGenius but would like a cheaper option, Smartipants would be a better choice. If you are like me and find the fit of a bG okay, but wants snaps and fleece, then you’d be happier with Haute Pocket Traditional One Size Pocket diapers. There are better diapers out there. These just fall short all over the place for me. Yes, they work. But why settle?

Here is my sad little bumGenius 3.0 one size pocket diaper after a little over a year of use.

A close up of my aplix tab on my bumGenius 3.0. You can see how yucky it looks and how it curls up, not holding where it is stuck.

And a close up of the loop strip. It is fraying. Sad little diaper needs to be put out of its misery.

Posted in Off The Bum

WAHMies Diaper Review

Wahmies one size pocket diapers are pretty good. I have used both the hook version and the snap version. These diapers have the greatest range of any of the one one size diapers I’ve tried.

The hook version of this diaper (the brown and blue one) really intrigued me. I was hoping for it to be toddler proof. However, Aidan can still get out of it. To the diaper’s benefit, though, he never could get the hooks open. He just figured out how to suck in his belly and wriggle out of the thing! The hooks are not difficult to use. Once you play with it a bit, you figure the system out. They do take a little longer to get on and off. I suppose if I only had these hooks, I’d be quite speedy with it by now. Also, you can’t exactly expect grandma to change their diaper in or out of this one. The snap version is much more user friendly, but the size range isn’t quite the same.

The interior of this diaper is velour. Not the cotton velour of swaddlebees, but a synthetic velour like the blue “velour” blankets my grandmother used to have on her beds. (I loved those blankets. So much so that my Granny bought me several when I went off to college. I still have them.) After about 150 washes, my velour started balding in a few places. So, just like the blankets, these will bald and thin a bit over time. After closer to 200 washes, the interiors are more bald than not bald. When it balds, there is not much you can do with the diaper. They still “work” but the interior fabric is then thin and sheer, providing no wicking of moisture away from the child’s bum. Not cool at all. You can use any rectangular insert in these. I use Nicki’s Diapers inserts. (bumGenius, Fuzzibunz, Smartipants, Tweedle Bugs, etc. would also work.) The interior does wick the moisture away quite well. (While it is intact.) Natural velour tends to hold the moisture more, but this synthetic stuff will keep the moisture away.

Wahmies also have elastic in the front. It keeps them much snugger, without cutting off circulation. They fit any shape or size without too much extra fuss. I never have the interior rolling out the top problem with these. (Can be a problem with one size diapers when using them snapped down.)

Also, the hook version has a tendency to leak from the front , where the loops are sewn down. They seem to wick through the stitches on the front. This only happens when they get REALLY wet. For this reason, I typically avoid using these on long car rides or overnight.

Like I said, Wahmies one size pocket diapers have a very big range. This is probably THE ONLY one size diaper I’ve used that really will fit newborn through potty training. This diaper has an extra set of snaps that other diapers don’t have. These easily fit at 6 lbs. These still easily fit at 38 lbs. The hook version has more range in this area, but even the snaps would easily fit a 6 lb. baby and still fit a 38 lb. toddler. However, if your child is more rolly or super thin, the hooks would definitely give you a much better fit! These really do fit birth to potty training as claimed! That is a super plus.

Would I recommend Wahmies? Oh absolutely! These are very good diapers! Great quality! Super fit! If you are needing a easy diaper that a care provider can also use, you may want to avoid the hook version. But if you are willing to work past the learning curve, the hooks are the way to go with this one! The snaps are fine, but the hooks really add a lot to this diaper.  And a perfect fit on 3 kids is hard to do! I wouldn’t say these are great quality diapers. While they will probably last through at least one child, that isn’t my life. I need diapers to last and last. This diaper definitely doesn’t wear as well as some other cloth diapers. 

As a side note, my diapers look so fluffy here because I was putting them on the older two for bed. They each had two inserts in them. I tend to overstuff at bedtime! (Better safe than sorry!) They are not normally so fluffy when stuffed normally. Also, note that the hook version is not typically a good choice as a night diaper, due to wicking at the front loops. However, the older two don’t often pee much at night, so I can safely use them on them. (I still stuff them like crazy, just in case.) If you have a very heavy wetter or a very heavy night wetter, the hook version would not be a good choice for you- you’d be much better off with the snaps!

**UPDATE! After about 300 washes, the PUL on my hook WAHMies peeled. That sucked. It means the diaper is now used on a teddy bear instead of the kids. Bummer.